Growing Lily of the valley · Ryder Family Farm- Southern Illinois
We to a big leap of faith, quit our jobs are moved to the the heart of the Shawnee National Forest to follow our dreams of self sufficiency and to make a go of living off the land… Can we help you feed your family?
Southern Illinois, farm, CSA, Goat Milk, Soap, Eggs, meat, local food
244
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-244,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-theme-ver-1.5.1,vertical_menu_enabled, vertical_menu_width_290,smooth_scroll,side_menu_slide_from_right,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.7.4,vc_responsive
 

Growing Lily of the valley

Growing Lily of the valley

I have tried to grow this once before and my poor lily of the valley pips got over watered and they rotted. I just got an order in the mail and discovered that I ordered some more pips to try and grow. I am throughly looking up the plant information today because I don’t want to kill these the second time around.

I have read that the plant pips should only be plated about 1 inch below the soil surface. This allows for the soil to be moist but the soil near the pips drains thus avoiding the pip rot I experienced. Also, taking care not to over water and choosing a well drained area will help prevent pip rot.

Lilly of the valley thrives in zones 3-7 but can also live in zones 2, 8 & 9 with proper care. It prefers partial shade with moist humus rich soil but can survive in full sun and other soil types. This is another plant (all parts) that is poisonous if ingested so keep these away from pets and kids!

I prefer to grow mine in pots, they are said to become invasive and can spread slowly but aggressively. These also need about 4-8 inches of space so if you choose to grow yours in containers be sure there is ample space. Also, lily of the valley thrives in cooler temperatures and is said to survive sub-zero temperatures so don’t be afraid to leave it outside through winter.

No Comments

Post a Comment